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Showing posts with label Cloud Music. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cloud Music. Show all posts

March 31, 2011

Jennifer Lopez Facebook Fans To Promote Her New Song


Jennifer Lopez is making fans work for her next single. To snag the song “I’m Into You” from iTunes before the official release date, enough fans have to “Like” the tune on her Facebook Page.

Lopez and her label, Island Def Jam, announced the campaign Wednesday with a custom tab on the artist’s Facebook Page titled “Like for Love?” The page includes a 30-second clip of the song, featuring Lil Wayne, and a call to show J-Lo love by clicking “Like.” So far, the song has received around 2,000 Likes (2% on J-Lo’s “Love Meter”) — but fans have until the official release date, April 5, to “Like” the jam.
Fans can also share a link to the page in order to win an autographed copy of Lopez’s new album, Love — those who get the most clicks on their links will score the goods, and those who share the link and “Like” the song could win a trip to see the American Idol finale in Los Angeles (Lopez appears as a judge on the show).
This is hardly the first time an artist has leveraged the Facebook Like to offer a song. In fact, Lil Wayne premiered the first single off of his new album exclusively on Facebook (with a call to “Like” to unlock), and Jay-Z and Kanye West launched a dedicated Page on the site so that fans could get a first listen of “H.A.M,” off of Watch the Throne.

March 29, 2011

Amazon Cloud Player Launched

Amazon has just entered the streaming music business. Amazon Cloud Drive, a Web-based online locker service, with a particular focus on music storage with the launch of Cloud Player, a music player that lets anyone upload their music to Amazon’s servers and play them via the web or Android.

The new Cloud Player service adds a new “Save to Amazon Cloud Drive” button for saving MP3s to the cloud, as well as an option to upload music from a hard drive to a user’s Cloud Drive. Users are given 5 GB of free storage, but can get 20 GB if they purchase an album through Amazon. It’s $1 per GB after that.


The company also announced two versions of the Amazon Cloud Player, one for the Web and another for Android. Both players allow users to upload their music, create playlists and organize their music. And because it’s a cloud-based platform, users can access their music and settings from any compatible computer or Android device.

The most comparable service to Cloud Drive is probably Grooveshark, which also lets you upload your music, though Amazon has several major advantages in its MP3 store, its longstanding payment system and its stronger brand recognition.The Web-based Cloud Player runs on Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari for Mac and Chrome browsers.

Google and Apple have been rumored to be hard at work on their own cloud-based players, but it looks like Amazon beat them to the punch. Amazon’s Cloud Player will certainly face a stiff challenge when they launch their own streaming music services, especially given Google’s control over Android and Apple’s control over iPhone and iTunes.