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Showing posts with label Investors. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Investors. Show all posts

July 22, 2015

London Universities which produced highest number of entrepreneurs



London Universities which produced highest number of entrepreneurs "

The most active UK University Alumni that have turned entrepreneurs 

This chart aims to  show which Universities  in UK have produced the highest  number of start up companies . The data shows the number of  Students from the universities who founded companies and turned entrepreneurs.

  1.  Oxford University beats Cambridge with 266 startups founded by alumni to 211 in Cambridge
  2. In London, LSE is the clear winner with 203 startups founded by its alumni with UCL and Imperial fighting for second place with 96 startups each.

London record 581,000 new start ups in a year, one startup in every minute


" which are UK's biggest start up activity"

London recorded  581,000 new companies  which were founded last year; more than one start up a minute

Research from national enterprise campaign StartUp Britain,  shows that 581,173 businesses were registered with Companies House last year.The above chart shows UK's cities hotspots where entrepreneurial spirit thrives . This  new record beats the previous all-time high of 526,446 in 2013, up from 484,224 start-ups formed in 2012.

  1.  London  topped as UK 's biggest entrepreneurial  and start up Hotspots  creating a record 184,671 companies
  2. Birmingham has become the leading start-up hub outside London, with 18,337 company registrations.
  3. Manchester is the next biggest start-up zone, with 13,054.  your post or banner displayed here for $10 a day .Click here to know more

May 9, 2015

Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Andreessen Horowitz tops tech companies IPO pipline

"who are the top 4  VC  investing   on biggest tech Companies "
data source : Cbinsights

The 4 top 4 VC investors having the biggest tech IPO in their pipeline 

The   biggest top 4  investors who have  invested in the companies that figure into the Tech IPO pipeline. Kleiner  Perkins most often first invested at the mid-stage (Series B/C), while Andreessen Horowitz most frequently invested in the Seed/Series A stages. Sequoia Capital and Andreessen Horowitz each saw the biggest jump in the number of portfolio companies in the pipeline, while Andreessen Horowitz now ties for fourth in this year’s rankings

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376 start ups in Asia raised $11.5b via vc funding

Highest Ownership of tech devices 

January 9, 2012

March 20, 2011

The Bubble 2.0: How Soon Will It Strike



For the first time since 2000, internet and technology entrepreneurs can raise seed capital with little more than a half-formed idea and a dozen PowerPoint slides. “There is probably a bubble in the number of start-ups,” says Alan Patricof, a venture capitalist, though he is not yet convinced that there is irrational exuberance in later-stage valuations.
Yet valuations have certainly risen, especially for the leading firms in this latest, “social” phase of the digital revolution. Groupon, a two-year-old firm that offers group discounts to online consumers, reportedly turned down an offer potentially worth $6 billion from Google, prompting analysts to ask if Groupon’s founders had lost their coupons. A secondary-market auction of shares in Facebook in December had a minimum offer-price 77% higher than the price reportedly paid in a similar transaction three months earlier. Twitter is valued at $3.7 billion, up nearly fourfold in a year. The number of deals with (pre-investment) valuations of at least $100m is also increasing, according to Cooley, a law firm (see chart).

There are differences between today and the dotcom bubble of a decade ago. Then it was initial public offerings that were overpriced. Today, although the IPO market is reviving, it remains a shadow of its former self. Instead, the main way for the owners of a start-up to cash out is to sell their firm to a bigger one, such as Cisco, Google, Facebook or even Groupon. These tech-savvy firms ought to be less gullible than the stockmarket investors of 1999. But their owners may now be so wealthy that they care less about value for money than the coolness of owning the Next Big Thing.
The emergence of an active secondary market in shares of start-ups yet to go public has allowed founders and early investors in firms such as Facebook and Twitter to bank fortunes without waiting for a traditional exit by IPO or acquisition. These secondary-market prices feed hype about what these firms might be worth, were they to list on the stockmarket.
Then there is the growth in “angel” investing, by rich individuals and small funds that provide seed capital to start-ups too small to interest a venture-capital firm. These angels make many small investments (say, $100,000 a time), in a strategy critics call “spray and pray”. That could certainly account for a bubble in start-ups. One prominent angel, Chris Sacca, has reportedly paused his investing on the ground that valuations have become overblown.

Today’s entrepreneurs also have a deeper understanding of the industries they are trying to transform, says Nick Beim of Matrix Partners, a venture-capital firm. Fewer of them are engineers. More are “ambitious non-technologists with a business idea” to change industries such as media, advertising, financial services or fashion. These industries are concentrated in New York, which is why the new boom is as much in Manhattan’s Silicon Alley as in California’s Silicon Valley.
Mr Beim reckons this industry expertise will mean that start-ups in “social commerce”, where there is a clear revenue model from the start, are more likely to succeed than those in social media, where no one knows where the profits will come from even when millions use the service (eg, Twitter). Three of the leading social-commerce firms, Groupon, Gilt Groupe (a luxury-goods seller in which Matrix has invested) and Zynga (a social-gaming firm), are increasing their revenues faster than any start-ups in history, says Mr Beim. That is why this time may be different. Of course they say that during every bubble. 

Source : Economist