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Showing posts with label US Telivision Trends. Show all posts
Showing posts with label US Telivision Trends. Show all posts

June 4, 2011

The Decline of The TV Generation in US

For the first time in 20 years, the number of homes in the United States with television sets has dropped.
The Nielsen Company, which takes TV set ownership into account when it produces ratings, will tell television networks and advertisers on Tuesday that 96.7 percent of American households now own sets, down from 98.9 percent previously.
There are two reasons for the decline, according to Nielsen. One is poverty: some low-income households no longer own TV sets, most likely because they cannot afford new digital sets and antennas.

The other reason  is technological metamorphosis that  has happened in  an average American lifestyle ,with increasing use of iPods, iphones, smartphones and gadgets like iphone, and ipads, Today US youngsters and even people   who are in their middle age group interact with theri laptops, palmtops and Netbooks along with Smartphones, Today  music devices, computing devices along with  ability to do things in real time ( Twitter and facebook ) has made  Americans  less " interested in a TV Set.

reason is prompting Nielsen to think about a redefinition of the term “television household” to include Internet video viewers. the economy was the reason cited by Nielsen when the percentage of homes with sets declined in 1992. That decline, the company’s report says, “also followed a prolonged recession and was reversed during the economic upswing of the mid-1990s.

Nielsen’s estimates incorporate the results of the 2010 census as well as the behavior of the approximately 50,000 Americans in the national sample that the company relies upon to make ratings projections.Nielsen’s research into these newly TV-less households indicates that they generally have incomes under $20,000. The transition to digital broadcasting from analog in 2009 aggravated the hardship for some of these households.
Source : Nytimes