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Showing posts with label US spendingh. Show all posts
Showing posts with label US spendingh. Show all posts

February 26, 2011

US Presidential Spending Statistics: Expenditures by Years

Click on the Image to see the larger Size  Picture( via visual Economics)







































Each president has had his own spending style and a different, current GDP amount. Ronald Reagan began his eight-year term in 1981 with a GDP amount of about $3 trillion. During that year, the expenditures were about $1 trillion. Both the GDP and the expenditure number climbed steadily during Reagan’s two terms. The final year of Reagan’s second term, 1988, saw a U.S. GDP of about $5 trillion and expenditures of about $1.75 trillion

George H. W. Bush was president during four years of steady GDP and expenditure growth, starting with a GDP of about $5 trillion in 1989. There were about $2 trillion in expenditures in 1989. At the end of his term, in 1992, the U.S. had a GDP of about $6.5 trillion. The U.S. government expenditures in 1992 were $2 trillion.

President Bill Clinton came into office with a U.S. GDP of $7 trillion in 1993. The expenditures of the U.S. government in 1993 were about $2 trillion. During Clinton’s eighth year of office, the GDP had greatly grown while the amount of U.S. expenditures rose moderately. The last year that Clinton was in office, 2000, showed the lowest expenditure to GDP ratio. That ratio was 32.6 percent. The GDP in 2000 was about $10 trillion. The U.S. expenditures of 2000 were about $3.2 trillion.

George W. Bush took office in 2001, and the GDP of the U.S. was about $10.3 trillion. The U.S. expenditures in 2001 were about $3.3 trillion. For the last year of George W. Bush’s two terms, in 2008, the U.S. GDP was about $14 trillion. The U.S. expenditures in 2008 were about $5 trillion.

President Barrack Obama took office in 2009 with the highest expenditure to GDP ratio. The ratio was 44.7 percent. In 2009, the U.S. GDP was about $14 trillion. U.S. expenditures were about $6.2 trillion. In 2010, the GDP is about $14.6 trillion. U.S. expenditures were about $7 trillion.

Spending Breakdown

During his eight years in office, President Reagan spent 15.9 percent of the expenditures on pensions. He spent 9.9 percent of the expenditures on health care. Education made up 14.4 percent of the expenditures. During that time, 19.2 percent of the expenditures were spent on defense. Welfare made up 9.4 percent of expenditures. The rest of the expenditures, 31.2 percent, went to miscellaneous expenses.

During his four years in office, President George H. W. Bush spent 15 percent of the expenditures on pensions. 10.7 percent of the expenditures were spent on health care. Education made up 14.4 percent of the expenditures. During that time, 16.7 percent of the expenditures were spent on defense. Welfare made up 8.5 percent of expenditures. The rest of the expenditures, 34.7 percent, went to miscellaneous expenses.

During the two terms of President Bill Clinton, 16.5 percent of the expenditures were spent on pensions. 14.1 percent of the expenditures were spent on health care. Education made up 17.3 percent of the expenditures. During that time, 12.4 percent of the expenditures were spent on defense. Welfare made up 9 percent of expenditures. The rest of the expenditures, 30.7 percent, went to miscellaneous expenses.

During the two terms of President George W. Bush, 16.3 percent of the expenditures were spent on pensions. 16.1 percent of the expenditures were spent on health care. Education made up 16.5 percent of the expenditures. During that time, 12.6 percent of the expenditures were spent on defense. Welfare made up 8.9 percent of expenditures. The rest of the expenditures, 29.6 percent, went to miscellaneous expenses.

In President Barrack Obama’s first two years in office, 15.2 percent of the expenditures were spent on pensions. 16.5 percent of the expenditures were spent on health care. Education made up 15.5 percent of the expenditures. During that time, 13.4 percent of the expenditures were spent on defense. Welfare made up 10.6 percent of expenditures. The rest of the expenditures, 28.8 percent, went to miscellaneous expenses.

Visual Economics: Presidential Spending: Expenditures by Year - http://www.visualeconomics.com/presidential-spending-expenditures-by-year/#ixzz1F3pNmYGP
http://www.visualeconomics.com/

February 25, 2011

US Consumers Spending : Trends and Insights

Each month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics gathers 84,000 prices in about 200 categories — like gasoline, bananas, dresses and garbage collection — to form the Consumer Price Index, one measure of inflation. It’s among the statistics that the Federal Reserve considered when it cut interest rates on Wednesday. The categories are weighted according to an estimate of what the average American spends, as shown below.

Source : Nytimes





An Average Consumer's Spending


Each shape below represents how much the average American spends in different categories.

Larger shapes make up a larger part of spendin


The average consumer has a budget that is split into a large number of monthly and yearly spending. The average consumer spends $49,638 a year on a range of necessary and desired expenditures. These expenditures come out of an annual household income of $63,091 per year on average, before taxes. The average consumer owns 1.9 vehicles, and 67 percent of them are homeowners with loans. Households average 2.5 people and 1.3 earners reside in each.

wheredidthemoneygo
The largest expenditure of the average household is housing. This takes up an average 34.1 percent of the yearly budget of households.

The second largest expenditure for the average consumer is transportation. The cost of vehicles purchased is an average of $3,244 per year, making it 6.5 percent of the average budget.

Another large expenditure is healthcare. The average consumer spends $2,853 on healthcare each year. Another physical necessity, food, costs consumers an average of $6,133 per year. An average of $3,465 of that is spent on food that is consumed at home, and $2,668 of it is spent on food consumed away from home. Combines, the money spent on food is 12.4 percent of the entire yearly household budget.

Insurance and pensions are important financial considerations and they cost the average consumer $5,336 per year. This is a total of 10.8 percent of the annual budget. $5,027 f this, 10.1 percent of the yearly budget, is spent on social security and pension contributions. In addition, the average consumer pays an average of $309 each year, making up 0.6 of the annual budget.

Source :Visual Economics: