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Showing posts with label corporate digital branding. Show all posts
Showing posts with label corporate digital branding. Show all posts

March 27, 2011

The Global Top 50 Social Brands:









































 




The most social Brands  hardly throw up any surprises. The technology giants  have ranked highest in the first 50 Top Brands in Social Media league table with eBay  ranking the " Most Social  Brands. Ebay   secured    No. 1 spot among the top 50 ranking of social brands, for most effectively and consistently engaging customers via social media channels, according to Alterian's inaugural Social Media Reputation (SMR) Index. Apple was second on the list, followed by Google, BlackBerry, and Amazon.

The SMR Index gauges brands' social effectiveness using a scoring system consisting of two elements: reach (social noise around the brand) and satisfaction (popularity). Also factoring in the "recency" of social interactions, the index then ranks companies on a scale of 1 to 100.
With a score of 92.29, eBay's win over Apple (88.61) and Google (87.00) was likely the result of the auction site's long-standing use of customer forums (starting in the late 1990s), corporate blogging, Twitter, and Facebook, according to the report.

In 6th position, Gucci is the highest ranked non-tech company, followed by Ford (7th) and MTV (8th). Other technology brands rounded out the top 10; these are Samsung (9th) and Yahoo (10th)


According to the survey, based Alterian’s analytics tool SM2, eBay was able to beat Apple and Google on the back of its long standing engagement with customers through a combination of forums, corporate blogging, Twitter and Facebook – it was one of the quickest to adopt Facebook’s Open Graph.

eBay has adopted Facebook's Open Graph so customers can split the cost of a gift and pay for their share via Paypal. The company also takes a social approach to internal communications, featuring blogs, forums, and discussions boards on the company intranet.

Apple being the no 2 brand in terms of engagement, throws up  some chatter specially by leading Industry leaders.Apple isn’t known for its transparency: the buzz that precedes a major product launch is fuelled by rumour, not by any official marketing communications. The lack of official communication helps to build the hype .

According to  Kate Hardley of SMR

"Apple’s avoidance of engagement with social media is legendary. But does it need to get involved? Its SMR score is enviably high with minimal official input from the brand. The trick to its success in social media is its two main advocates: Steve Jobs, and Apple fans.  

Apple’s social media strategy is to create great products, and let people get on with talking to each other about them. Apple products are disruptive. Other companies may produce products as good – or even better – but they’re playing catch-up to a brand that reportedly has its product pipeline agreed until 2013.

David Eldrige, CEO of Alterian  believes that as a brand, Apple doesn’t proactively interact with its customers, so it might come as a surprise to some that they reached the number two position. Apple’s attitude is that their products generate enough consumer chatter that they don’t need to directly engage. Once a new product rumour starts, it builds enough hype through the online buzz that has been created.
“Apple’s fans are responsible for creating thousands of unofficial social media accounts on behalf of the company, and it’s because of this overwhelming enthusiasm for Apple’s products that the company has done so well.”


The Top 50 Social Reputation Index (SMR) Index, developed by Yomego.

March 17, 2011

The Mobile Users of Today: Trends and Insights




Mobile & Attitudes - a Mobile Web User Typology from MRM Worldwide Deutschland on Vimeo.


Mobile & Attitudes – a Mobile Web User Typology by MRM Worldwide in cooperation with the Technical University Darmstadt.

Background:

Mobile online usage is growing rapidly but attention has been focused on devices, networks and operating systems instead of the users.

Objective:
Find out WHO is spending time in the mobile internet and HOW different user groups are using the mobile online services - in one of the most comprehensive ways ever available.

Methodology:
For the representative quantitative online survey, 1,717 Internet users between the ages of 16 and 70 years old from Germany and the UK were interviewed in late 2010.

Results:
A comprehensive study in which 4 different mobile web user types were developed – not based on things like "Apple vs. Android vs. Blackberry", "smartphone vs. feature phone", "app vs. web" etc. but on different mobile internet usage.

Implications:
Useful behavior insights for the future of your mobile marketing initiatives. Find out how active is your target groups regarding the mobile web, the applications they use and the apps and mobile services they show interest in.( source:Mobile Atitude )

March 12, 2011

Top 100 Brands by worldwide media spending

Spenders By Industry and Vertical


Most industries spent less on advertising in 2009 than they did in 2008. The faltering economy guaranteed that. Consider the automotive companies: They led the way by spending more than $4 billion in advertising during the period surveyed. But that represents a 31 percent drop from what the auto sector spent from January through June of 2008.
  • Financial services companies, which spent the third-highest amount of advertising money in January through June of 2009 at just under $3 billion, spent a whopping 24 percent more on advertising one year earlier.
    The telecom companies, though, did buck this trend. In January through June of 2009, they spent $4 billion in advertising. That’s an increase of 8 percent from the year earlier. Telecom and restaurants, in fact, were the only business sectors that spent more on advertising in the first half of 2009 than they did in the first half of 2008. And the restaurant business, which spent slightly under $3 billion in advertising in the first half of 2009, only increased its adverting spending by 1 percent from the same period in 2008, so it barely counts.
     
  • The top 100  Corporates Spending   comes from the " Market Study" courtesy, Advertising Age

    • Abbott Laboratories
    Worldwide measured media spending $306.6 million
    Aldi Group
    Worldwide measured media spending $722.6 million
    • American Express Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $428.8 million
    • Anheuser-Busch InBev
    Worldwide measured media spending $875.8 million
    • Apple
    Worldwide measured media spending $442.3 million
    • AstraZeneca
    Worldwide measured media spending $376.7 million
    • Avon Products
    Worldwide measured media spending $249.8 million
    • Axa Group
    Worldwide measured media spending $298.6 million
    • Bayer
    Worldwide measured media spending $770.5 million
    • BMW
    Worldwide measured media spending $681.9 million
    • Boehringer Ingelheim
    Worldwide measured media spending $405.3 million

    • Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $440.5 million
    • Burger King Holdings
    Worldwide measured media spending $432.6 million
    • Campbell Soup Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $558.7 million
    • Canon
    Worldwide measured media spending $480.7 million
    • Carrefour
    Worldwide measured media spending $510.7 million
    • Chrysler Group
    Worldwide measured media spending $659.4 million
    • Citigroup
    Worldwide measured media spending $267.9 million
    • Clorox Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $515.4 million
    • Colgate-Palmolive Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $887.3 million
    • Coty (Jab Investments)
    Worldwide measured media spending $324.0 million
    • Daimler
    Worldwide measured media spending $679.1 million

    • Danone Groupe
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.62 billion
    • Dell
    Worldwide measured media spending $489.2 million
    • Deutsche Telekom
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.40 billion
    • Diageo
    Worldwide measured media spending $304.3 million

    • Doctor's Associates (Subway)
    Worldwide measured media spending $448.2 million
    • Eli Lilly & Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $394.2 million
    • Ferrero
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.17 billion
    • Fiat
    Worldwide measured media spending $693.7 million
    • Ford Motor Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $2.06 billion
    • France Telecom
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.04 billion

    • Fuji Heavy Industries (Subaru)
    Worldwide measured media spending $388.2 million
    • General Electric Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.15 billion
    • General Mills
    Worldwide measured media spending $934.7 million
    • General Motors Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $3.27 billion
    • GlaxoSmithKline
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.63 billion
    • Hasbro
    Worldwide measured media spending $287.8 million
    • Heineken
    Worldwide measured media spending $351.1 million
    • Henkel
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.37 billion
    • Hewlett-Packard Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $313.7 million
    • Honda Motor Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.37 billion

    • Hyundai Motor Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $828.9 million
    • IBM Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $311.9 million
    • Ikea International
    Worldwide measured media spending $436.3 million
    • ING Group
    Worldwide measured media spending $412.3 million
    • Johnson & Johnson
    Worldwide measured media spending $2.25 billion
    • Kao Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $789.4 million
    • Kellogg Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.10 billion
    • Kia Motors Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $536.1 million
    • Kimberly-Clark Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $359.2 million
    • Kraft Foods
    Worldwide measured media spending $2.12 billion
    • L'Oreal
    Worldwide measured media spending $4.56 billion
    • LG Group
    Worldwide measured media spending $474.8 million
    • LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton
    Worldwide measured media spending $559.7 million
    • Mars Inc.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.59 billion
    • MasterCard
    Worldwide measured media spending $299.8 million
    • Mattel
    Worldwide measured media spending $395.2 million
    • Maxingvest (Beiersdorf, Tchibo)
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.19 billion

    • Mazda Motor Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $442.7 million
    • McDonald's Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $2.08 billion
    • Merck & Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $773.6 million
    • Microsoft Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $713.0 million
    • Mitsubishi Motors Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $457.3 million
    • Nestle
    Worldwide measured media spending $2.62 billion
    • News Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.27 billion
    • Nintendo Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $658.0 million
    • Nissan Motor Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.12 billion
    • Nokia Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $278.6 million
    • Novartis
    Worldwide measured media spending $561.4 million
    • Panasonic Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.12 billion

    • PepsiCo
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.45 billion
    • Pfizer
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.83 billion
    • Procter & Gamble Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $8.68 billion
    • PSA Peugeot Citroen
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.43 billion
    • Reckitt Benckiser
    Worldwide measured media spending $2.24 billion
    • Renault
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.09 billion
    • SABMiller (MillerCoors)
    Worldwide measured media spending $638.0 million
    • Samsung Group
    Worldwide measured media spending $705.4 million
    • Sanofi-Aventis
    Worldwide measured media spending $426.9 million
    • Sara Lee Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $255.0 million
    • SC Johnson
    Worldwide measured media spending $875.2 million
    • Sears Holdings Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $795.1 million

    • Sharp Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $331.2 million
    • Sony Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.71 billion
    • Suzuki Motor Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $380.9 million
    • Telefonica
    Worldwide measured media spending $587.0 million
    • Time Warner
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.41 billion
    • Toyota Motor Corp.
    Worldwide measured media spending $2.31 billion
    • Unilever
    Worldwide measured media spending $6.03 billion
    • Viacom
    Worldwide measured media spending $760.8 million
    • Visa
    Worldwide measured media spending $403.7 million
    • Vivendi
    Worldwide measured media spending $767.1 million

    • Vodafone
    Worldwide measured media spending $879.7 million

    • Volkswagen
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.94 billion
    • Walmart Stores
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.42 billion
    • Walt Disney Co.
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.44 billion
    • Yum Brands
    Worldwide measured media spending $1.33 billion










    About The Data:ABOUT GLOBAL MARKETERS 2010
    Advertising Age's DataCenter produced the Global Marketers report.

    Global marketers that became the Top 100 were collated from media lists from 93 countries (plus breakouts for Hong Kong, Puerto Rico and the Pan Arab region) and provided by monitoring services. Primary sources of data by country include Kantar Media (formerly TNS); Nielsen Co.; Ibope (Latin America); AGB Nielsen Media Research; Pan Arab Research Center; Synovate (East Africa); Sigma Conseil (North and Western Africa) and Ifat (Israel). (See each country or the source links tab for links.) In some cases, monitoring services are licensees or partners of Nielsen or Kantar. Other independent companies also supplied data. Interpublic's McCann Erickson and UM, Publicis Groupe's Saatchi & Saatchi and WPP's JWT and Mindshare contributed significantly to the report.

    To determine the top advertisers in each country, Ad Age DataCenter started with listings from monitoring services that ranged from as few as five advertisers in smaller countries to as many as 500 advertisers in larger countries. In all cases, the Ad Age DataCenter aggregated spending by parent company. For example, Asda spending in the U.K. is attributed to Walmart Stores for the Top 100 ranking. Data reported by brand were similarly summed by parent advertiser. (Wrigley is included in Mars, for example.)

    Ad Age DataCenter determined the Global 100 by combining media-spending data from 93 countries (plus breakouts for Hong Kong, Puerto Rico and the Pan Arab region), using data contributed by media-tracking services. To qualify as "global," a marketer had to have reported media spending in at least three major regions.

    Several major U.S. companiesincluding Verizon Communications and AT&T, which spent in the range of $2 billion on 2009 measured mediadidn't make the list because their spending was almost entirely in the U.S.

    Media lists per country were by gross ad rates (unless otherwise noted). Advertising Age adjusted some markets' gross media expenditures to reflect a market's global media volume among all countries.

    A Top 100 marketer had to have reported media spending in at least three of these major regions--U.S. and Canada; Latin America; Europe, Middle East, Africa; Asia and Pacific--to qualify as "global" regardless of headquarters.

    Because Ad Age treats exchange rates on a historic basis, exchange rate fluctuations may decrease spending outside the U.S. due to the dollar's rise in 2009 versus 2008.

    Advertising spending percent changes are based on more statistically accurate data than Ad Age's published spending figures, which are in millions and rounded to one decimal place.

    Global 100 figures shown are estimates of media spending. Related content: See Ad Age's 100 Leading National Advertisers, which ranks marketers by total U.S. spending (media spending plus unmeasured spending estimates); see Marketer Trees 2010 database






















































June 26, 2010

Socialnomics: The Social Media Revolution



Social Media unlike other marketing activities needs to be embraced and integrated across the organizations in order to be truly effective . The Biggest hurdle in developing a social media strategy today is the lack of " executive Buy in "

If your company wants to be successful in social media .. the senior management has to be convinced about the need to have your social media optimization plans ready. Social media has to be embraced top down across the organizational structures cutting across hierarchy and silos. Unlike traditional marketing social media is too important to be left with only your "Online Marketing Team"

For those of you who wants to convince your Senior Management on the need to have a social media strategy for your Brand, This Video might just do the trick.

Social media has to be embraced top down across the organizational structures.

August 29, 2009

The top 5 worst brands on "Twitter"

Revolutionmagazine recently blogged on "Twitter FAIL! The 8 worst brands on the world's hottest microblog Twitter" about how Brands are using twitter to engage with their customers. While most brands would ideally want to use twitter as a extension of their brand image in the online space and engage with their prospects to provide a real time interface for communication,Some brands merely use twitter as an extension of their RSS feeds

Clearly, there is huge potential for advertisers wishing to engage with consumers via Twitter provided, that is, they don't completely forget their branding value and uses this platform as a tool to influence,educate and enable interaction with their brand.

Revolution commissioned i-level's social media unit, Jam, to track down Twitter's biggest offenders. Here are eight big-name brands with microblogging strategies you'll want to avoid and learn from them on how companies and brands should not to use twitter.

AMAZON

@amazon

Amazon's approach to Twitter is disappointing according to the study by Jam. Amazon uses uses a 'Twitter bot' to automatically publish excerpts from its US blog. These tweets clutter the user's homepage and add little value beyond that of a standard RSS feed. This is the reason the huge number of mentions the brand receives on Twitter is not matched by its followers. According to Jam, by allowing users to integrate its recommendation engine into their Twitter accounts it could suggest products and reviews based on what individual consumers are tweeting about.

1,206 - Followers

245,760 - Mentions

HEWLETT PACKARD

@hpnews

HP is another example of a brand that simply uses Twitter as an additional outlet for its RSS feedAccording to Jam, the brand could utilise Twitter as a customer-service channel, offering consumers a valuable mix of aftercare and technical support. It could then make @hpnews more conversational, engaging the huge number of consumers that use Twitter to keep up to date with the latest tech and gadget news.

1,832 - Followers

56,720 - Mentions

eBAY

@ebayuk
The brand uses the microblogging service to offer consumers news about the auction site and the odd product recommendation. This provides users with nothing they don't already get from eBay's promotional emails, hence its relatively small following. Research commissioned by Revolutionmagazine shows that by integrating Twitter more closely into its core business offering, eBay could allow users to tweet bids into its site or receive notifications through Twitter's direct message functionality, helping them to manage their eBay account.

1,532 - Followers

107,000 - Mentions

MCDONALD'S

@monopolyatmcd

The fast-food giant uses the microblogging service to raise awareness of its Monopoly promotion, which gives consumers the chance to win 34 million prizes. Users are bombarded with advertising messages about how they can take part in the competition and the winners are notified by @replies to, which appear on the homepages of all 236 followers. Beyond this, McDonald's makes no attempt to engage Twitter users or build a community around its brand. Mc Donald could also use twitter to announce new offerings along with special offerings for every 1000th customer who books or orders via Twitter.

236 - Followers

45,340 - Mentions"

read the original post about the worst Brands on twitter here