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Showing posts with label economic infographic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label economic infographic. Show all posts

March 20, 2011

February 26, 2011

February 21, 2011

Money Supply as Percent of GDP by Country

infographic from Credit Loan







How does your country compare to other countries in terms of money? The amount of quasi money in each country when measured as a percentage of a country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is pretty telling. Check out the graphic to see how your country rates and whether it makes the top 10, the bottom 10 or falls somewhere in the middle.This llustrates which countries are located across which spectrum

Where are the top and bottom countries located? Are they countries that are typically thought of as being rich and poor, or do they come straight out of left field for a sneak attack? There are certainly some countries in there that will surprise you as well as some that won’t. Take a look for yourself and see where the wealth of the world lies.

In economics, the money supply or money stock, is the total amount of money available in an economy at a particular point in time. There are several ways to define "money," but standard measures usually include currency in circulation and demand deposits (depositors' easily-accessed assets on the books of financial institutions)
The different types of money are typically classified as "M"s. The "M"s usually range from M0 (narrowest) to M3 (broadest) but which "M"s are actually used depends on the country's central bank. The typical layout for each of the "M"s is as follows:
Type of money
M0
MB
M1
M2
M3
MZM
Notes and coins (currency) in circulation (outside Federal Reserve Banks, and the vaults of depository institutions)
V
V
V
V
V
V
Notes and coins (currency) in bank vaults
V
V




Federal Reserve Bank credit (minimum reserves and excess reserves)

V




traveler's checks of non-bank issuers


V
V
V
V
demand deposits


V
V
V
V
other checkable deposits (OCDs), which consist primarily of negotiable order of withdrawal (NOW) accounts at depository institutions and credit union share draft accounts.


V
V
V
V
savings deposits



V
V
V
time deposits less than $100,000 and money-market deposit accounts for individuals



V
V

large time deposits, institutional money market funds, short-term repurchase and other larger liquid asset




V

All money market funds





V
  • M0: In some countries, such as the United Kingdom, M0 includes bank reserves, so M0 is referred to as the monetary base, or narrow money
  • MB: is referred to as the monetary base or total currency This is the base from which other forms of money (like checking deposits, listed below) are created and is traditionally the most liquid measure of the money supply
  • M1: Bank reserves are not included in M1.
  • M2: represents money and "close substitutes" for money. M2 is a broader classification of money than M1. Economists use M2 when looking to quantify the amount of money in circulation and trying to explain different economic monetary conditions. M2 is a key economic indicator used to forecast inflation.
  • M3: Since 2006, M3 is no longer tracked by the US central bank. However, there are still estimates produced by various private institutions. (M2 +large deposits and other large, long-term deposits)
  • MZM: Money with zero maturity. It measures the supply of financial assets redeemable at par on demand.
The ratio of a pair of these measures, most often M2/M0, is called an (actual, empirical) money multiplier.




Credit Loan:
http://www.creditloan.com/ 





Credit Loan: Money Supply as Percent of GDP by Country | http://www.creditloan.com/infographics/money-supply-as-percent-of-gdp-by-country/#ixzz1EbihTFAX
http://www.creditloan.com/

February 20, 2011