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Showing posts with label mergers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label mergers. Show all posts

January 30, 2016

May 12, 2015

The Verizon and AOL 4$4.4billion deal to create a technology media monolith

why verizon  is acquiring  AOL for $4.4billon"








 This chart compares dial up, broadband and mobile eras of the internet ecosystem.  against iphone 4G subscribers vs Netflix subscriber base in US. if you study this chart  for long enough.. you will realise why Verizon Communications is buying AOL for $4.4 billion

 The rational of Verizon’s $4.4 billion deal to acquire AOL is because of that one device that is changing the world in ways that was never though to be possible. MOBILE . 

Verizon needed arsenal at its command to build up its nascent video business and advertising across consumer's mobile phones .. and the best way to get them was AOL which has transformed itself into a media company and invested heavily in technology that automates the sale of online advertising process  

 Verizon's woes with 130 million subscribers has of late been typically those  of all legacy carriers , whose business is threatened by newer entrants and competitors  that are finding alternative means of connecting and hooking up to the internet via wi fi mesh networks and facing competition from giant players like  google  who have started to challenge them at their own game 

Read the full analysis of the Verizon and AOL Merger

September 8, 2011

The End of Yahoo: How Long Before its Sold off


There are few surer ways for an executive to lose a good reputation than to be CEO of Yahoo Inc. Just ask Carol Bartz or Terry Semel.This infographic, titled “The Rise And Fall Of Yahoo,” gives you a play by play of the company’s history, acquisitions, highs, lows and more.

As the company searches for Bartz's replacement, its biggest obstacle is likely the track record of past CEOs who have made this Hot Seat kind of Haunted.When Carol Bartz took the wheel at Yahoo! in January 2009 she was seen as the tough-talking, bottom-line oriented CEO who led software developer Autodesk to prodigious revenue and share price growth. One of her first acts was to tell employees that she would “drop-kick to fucking Mars” anyone who was caught leaking company secrets. Now it is Ms Bartz who has been drop-kicked out of the company.


Carol Bartz  as she left Yahoo Tuesday, she was viewed as an executive incapable of innovation and lacking vision, an executive who failed to move Yahoo's stock price or operating performance in any meaningful way.She is also widely seen as having made a bad deal to hand Yahoo's search engine operations to Microsoft.

"Bartz's demise underscores that fallen angels in the Internet space are really hard to turn around," Needham & Co. analyst Laura Martin wrote in a report Wednesday. "Her lack of success raises the risk that perhaps it simply can't be done by anyone (unless you're Steve Jobs).
On September 6th news leaked via AllThingsD,  that she had been ousted in a surprise coup by Yahoo!’s board. Official confirmation swiftly followed, with the news that Tim Morse, the firm’s chief financial officer, would take over as interim chief executive, supported by a leadership committee of senior managers.

Part of the reason Yahoo's CEOs face such difficulty is because, sources say, they are just one prong of a leadership trifecta, with the board and Yang also having significant input into the decision-making process. Those influential camps are often not on the same page.

For example, the decision to fire Bartz without naming a successor, along with the plan to initiate a "strategic review," suggested that the company was laying the groundwork for a sale or merger. But Yang told executives during a meeting on Wednesday morning that the company was not for sale, according to a person familiar with the matter.

June 12, 2011

The Making Of Skype " Timeline and Competitors



Spring 2003: Skype is founded by Niklas Zennstr̦m and Janus Friis, two technology developers and entrepreneurs. The pair had already made their name by creating Kazaa, a peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing program which Рrather like Napster Рproved highly popular with PC users but provoked the wrath of the entertainment industry.
July 2004: Skype launches SkypeOut, a new service that allows Skype users to call a landline or mobile phone. Charges began at just two euro cents a minute to landlines within Europe, the US, Australia and New Zealand. The next month an Apple-compatible version of Skype was offered.

January 2005: With Skype attracting 23 million registered users during its first 18 months, analysts calculate that its popularity will soon eat into the profitability of traditional telecoms companies.

April 2005: Skype hits the 100-million downloads mark, fuelled by rapid take-up of broadband.

August 2005: Google wades into the VoIP market with its own application, Google Talk. Skype hits back immediately through an alliance with Intel, which invested an undisclosed sum in the company. Microsoft was also investing in VoIP that month, snapping up a small internet calling start-up called Teleo in an attempt to improve its MSN Messenger app.

September 2005: After weeks of rumours, eBay agrees to buy Skype for $2.6bn in cash and stock.  This buyout enabled eBay  to monetize Skype's userbase – which has doubled to 52 million since the start of the year. Others, though, suggest that the deal might prevent Skype from ever truly challenging the traditional telephone industry.

December 2005: Skype launches video calling, a service already offered by several other VoIP companies.

May 2006: SkypeCasts, which allow up to 100 people to join a single call, are created to capitalise on the boom in social networking.
January 2007: US court rejects a $4bn (£2.4bn) lawsuit which claimed Skype's underlying technology violated various patents.


October 2007: Two years on, and with little sign of integration between the pair, eBay admits that its acquisition of Skype has not been a runaway success. It takes a $900m impairment write-down – effectively admitting that it overpaid for the company.

April 2009: eBay announces plans to float Skype on the stock market. "Skype is a great standalone business, with strong fundamentals and accelerating momentum. But it's clear that Skype has limited synergies with eBay and PayPal," says John Donahoe, eBay's chief executive.

September 2009: eBay abandons the planned IPO, and instead sells a 65% stake in Skype to a group of investors for $2bn. This includes a venture capital firm owned by Marc Andreessen, the technology pioneer who created the Netscape browser in the 1990s

November 2009: Joltid takes a 14% stake in Skype, in return for dropping its lawsuits and injecting a substantial amount of capital into the firm. This left Skype's new owners holding 56%, with eBay still owning 30%.

August 2010: Skype announces plans to float on the US stock market. It also faces opposition from BSkyB over the trademark for 'Skype' in Europe.
May 2011: Skype is rumoured to be changing hands again, with Facebook and Google both reportedly holding talks with the company. Then, on 10 May, Microsoft announces its $8.5bn takeover.


Skype Competitors: Apart from the List above Some of the competitors who are perhaps not that well known

Viber due to the speed at which they grow, but they will need more than that to take on Skype.

Apple with FaceTime. With their multitude of hit devices, Apple has a lot of power to push this standard.

Tango :Another VOIP application called Tango that allows free calls to other Tango users. Tango currently runs on iOS and Android devices. It uses the mobile number as the username and registers automatically. It also synchronized with the phone book contacts.